Show simple item record

dc.creatorHidalgo León, Hugo G.
dc.creatorAlfaro Martínez, Eric J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T20:24:54Z
dc.date.available2016-02-25T20:24:54Z
dc.date.issued2012-11
dc.identifier.citationhttp://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/rbt/issue/archivees_ES
dc.identifier.issn0034-7744
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/15647
dc.descriptionArtículo científico -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Centro de Investigaciones Geofísicas, 2012es_ES
dc.description.abstractTwo methods for selecting a subset of simulations and/or general circulation models (GCMs) from a set of 30 available simulations are compared: 1) Selecting the models based on their performance on reproducing 20th century climate, and 2) random sampling. In the first case, it was found that the performance methodology is very sensitive to the type and number of metrics used to rank the models and therefore the results are not robust to these conditions. In general, including more models in a multi-model ensemble according to their rank (of skill in reproducing 20th century climate) results in an increase in the multi-model skill up to a certain point and then the inclusion of more models degrades the skill of the multi-model ensemble. In a similar fashion when the models are introduced in the ensemble at random, there is a point where the inclusion of more models does not change significantly the skill of the multi-model ensemble. For precipitation the subset of models that produces the maximum skill in reproducing 20th century climate also showed some skill in reproducing the climate change projections of the multi-model ensemble of all simulations. For temperature, more models/simulations are needed to be included in the ensemble (at the expense of a decrease in the skill of reproducing the climate of the 20th century for the selection based on their ranks). For precipitation and temperature the use of 7 simulations out of 30 resulted in the maximum skill for both approaches to introduce the models.es_ES
dc.description.abstractSe emplearon dos métodos para escoger un subconjunto a partir de treinta simulaciones de Modelos de Circulación General. El primer método se basó en la habilidad de cada uno de los modelos en reproducir el clima del siglo XX y el segundo en un muestreo aleatorio. Se encontró que el primero de ellos es muy sensible al tipo y métrica usada para categorizar los modelos, lo que no arrojó resultados robustos bajo estas condiciones. En general, la inclusión de más modelos en el agrupamiento de multi-modelos ordenados de acuerdo a su destreza en reproducir el clima del siglo XX, resultó en un aumento en la destreza del agrupamiento de multi-modelos hasta cierto punto, y luego la inclusión de más modelos/simulaciones degrada la destreza del agrupamiento de multi-modelos. De manera similar, en la inclusión de modelos de forma aleatoria, existe un punto en que agregar más modelos no cambia significativamente la destreza del agrupamiento de muti-modelos. Para el caso de la precipitación, el subconjunto de modelos que produce la máxima destreza en reproducir el clima del siglo XX también mostró alguna destreza en reproducir las proyecciones de cambio climático del agrupamiento de multi-modelos para todas las simulaciones. Para temperatura, más modelos/simulaciones son necesarios para ser incluidos en el agrupamiento (con la consecuente disminución en la destreza para reproducir el clima del siglo XX). Para precipitación y temperatura, el uso de 7 simulaciones de 30 posibles resultó en el punto de máxima destreza para ambos métodos de inclusión de modelos.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partially financed by projects (808-A9-180, 805-A9-224, 805-A9-532, 808-B0-092, 805-A9-742, 805-A8-606 and 808-A9-070) from the Center for Geophysical Research (CIGEFI) and the Marine Science and Limnology Research Center (CIMAR) of the University of Costa Rica (UCR). Thanks for the logistics support of the School of Physics of UCR. The authors were also funded through an Award from Florida Ice and Farm Company (Amador, Alfaro and Hidalgo). HH is also funded through a grant from the Panamerican Institute of Geography and History (GEOF.02.2011). The authors are obliged to André Stahl from UCR who processed much of the raw GCM data and Mary Tyree from Scripps Institution of Oceanography who provided the land-sea masks of the models. Also to María Fernanda Padilla and Natalie Mora for their help with the data base. Finally, to the National Council of Public University Presidents (CONARE), for the support of a FEES project “Interacciones oceáno-atmósfera y la biodiversidad marina del Parque Nacional Isla del Coco” (project 808-B0-654, UCR). We would like to thank two anonymous reviewers and Dr. Javier Soley that helped improve the quality of this article.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.publisherRevista Biología Tropical 60 (3): 67-81es_ES
dc.sourceRevista de Biología Trpical 60(Suppl. 3): 67-81, November 2012es_ES
dc.subjectEastern Tropical Pacific Seascapees_ES
dc.subjectclimate changees_ES
dc.subjectgeneral circulation modelses_ES
dc.subjectprecipitationes_ES
dc.subjectair surface temperaturees_ES
dc.titleGlobal Model selection for evaluation of Climate Change projections in the Eastern Tropical Pacific Seascapees_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigaciones Geofísicas (CIGEFI)es_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record