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dc.creatorNúñez Rangel, Vitelbina
dc.creatorCid, Pedro
dc.creatorSanz, Libia
dc.creatorDe La Torre, Pilar
dc.creatorAngulo Ugalde, Yamileth
dc.creatorLomonte, Bruno
dc.creatorGutiérrez, José María
dc.creatorCalvete Chornet, Juan José
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-06T17:40:59Z
dc.date.available2016-12-06T17:40:59Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-02
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1874391909002383es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1874-3919
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/29352
dc.description.abstractThe venom proteomes of Bothrops atrox from Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Perú were characterized using venomic and antivenomic strategies. Our results evidence the existence of two geographically differentiated venom phenotypes. The venom from Colombia comprises at least 26 different proteins belonging to 9 different groups of toxins. PI-metalloproteinases and K49-PLA2 molecules represent the most abundant toxins. On the other hand, the venoms from Brazilian, Ecuadorian, and Peruvian B. atrox contain predominantly PIII-metalloproteinases. These toxin profiles correlate with the venom phenotypes of adult and juvenile B. asper from Costa Rica, respectively, suggesting that paedomorphism represented a selective trend during the trans-Amazonian southward expansion of B. atrox through the Andean Corridor. The high degree of crossreactivity of a Costa Rican polyvalent (Bothrops asper, Lachesis stenophrys, Crotalus simus) antivenom against B. atrox venoms further evidenced the close evolutionary kinship between B. asper and B. atrox. This antivenom was more efficient immunodepleting proteins from the venoms of B. atrox from Brazil, Ecuador, and Perú than from Colombia. Such behaviour may be rationalized taking into account the lower content of poorly immunogenic toxins, such as PLA2 molecules and PI-SVMPs in the paedomorphic venoms. The immunological profile of the Costa Rican antivenom strongly suggests the possibility of using this antivenom for the management of snakebites by B. atrox in Colombia and the Amazon regions of Ecuador, Perú and Brazil.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipMinisterio de Educación y Ciencia/FU2007-61563//Españaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[741-A7-611]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCiencia y Tecnología para el Desarrollo/206AC0281/CYTED/Españaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipConsejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas/[2007CR0004]/CRUSA-CSIC/Españaes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceJournal of Proteomics; Volumen 73, Número 1, 2009es_ES
dc.subjectBothrops atroxes_ES
dc.subjectCommon lanceheades_ES
dc.subjectAntivenomicses_ES
dc.subjectVenom proteomees_ES
dc.subjectViperid toxinses_ES
dc.subjectN-terminal sequencinges_ES
dc.subjectMass spectrometryes_ES
dc.subjectGeographic venom phenotype variationes_ES
dc.subjectPaedomorphismes_ES
dc.subjectSnake venomes_ES
dc.titleSnake venomics and antivenomics of Bothrops atrox venoms from Colombia and the Amazon regions of Brazil, Perú and Ecuador suggest the occurrence of geographic variation of venom phenotype by a trend towards paedomorphismes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jprot.2009.07.013
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP)es_ES


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