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dc.creatorGloria Soria, Andreaes_ES
dc.creatorAyala, Diegoes_ES
dc.creatorBheecarry, Ambicaduttes_ES
dc.creatorCalderón Arguedas, Ólgeres_ES
dc.creatorChadee, Dave D.es_ES
dc.creatorChiappero, Marinaes_ES
dc.creatorCoetzee, Maureenes_ES
dc.creatorBin Elahee, Khouaildies_ES
dc.creatorFernández Salas, Ildefonsoes_ES
dc.creatorKamal, Hany A.es_ES
dc.creatorKamgang, Basilees_ES
dc.creatorKhater, Emad I. M.es_ES
dc.creatorKramer, Laura D.es_ES
dc.creatorKramer, Vickies_ES
dc.creatorLópez Solís, Almaes_ES
dc.creatorLutomiah, Joeles_ES
dc.creatorMartins Jr, Ademires_ES
dc.creatorMicieli, María Victoriaes_ES
dc.creatorPaupy, Christophees_ES
dc.creatorPonlawat, Alongkotes_ES
dc.creatorRahola, Niles_ES
dc.creatorRasheed, Syed Basites_ES
dc.creatorRichardson, Joshua B.es_ES
dc.creatorSaleh, Amag A.es_ES
dc.creatorSánchez Casas, Rosa Maríaes_ES
dc.creatorSeixas, Gonçaloes_ES
dc.creatorSousa, Carla A.es_ES
dc.creatorTabachnick, Walter J.es_ES
dc.creatorTroyo Rodríguez, Adrianaes_ES
dc.creatorPowell, Jeffrey R.es_ES
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T21:02:54Zes_ES
dc.date.available2017-07-14T21:02:54Zes_ES
dc.date.issued2016-11es_ES
dc.identifier.citationhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mec.13866/abstractes_ES
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083es_ES
dc.identifier.otherPMC5123671es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/30365es_ES
dc.description.abstractMosquitoes, especially Aedes aegypti, are becoming important models for studying invasion biology. We characterized genetic variation at 12 microsatellite loci in 79 populations of Ae. aegypti from 30 countries in six continents, and used them to infer historical and modern patterns of invasion. Our results support the two subspecies Ae. aegypti formosus and Ae. aegypti aegypti as genetically distinct units. Ae. aegypti aegypti populations outside Africa are derived from ancestral African populations and are monophyletic. The two subspecies co-occur in both East Africa (Kenya) and West Africa (Senegal). In rural/forest settings (Rabai District of Kenya), the two subspecies remain genetically distinct, whereas in urban settings, they introgress freely. Populations outside Africa are highly genetically structured likely due to a combination of recent founder effects, discrete discontinuous habitats and low migration rates. Ancestral populations in sub-Saharan Africa are less genetically structured, as are the populations in Asia. Introduction of Ae. aegypti to the New World coinciding with trans-Atlantic shipping in the 16th to 18th centuries was followed by its introduction to Asia in the late 19th century from the New World or from now extinct populations in the Mediterranean Basin. Aedes mascarensis is a genetically distinct sister species to Ae. aegypti s.l. This study provides a reference database of genetic diversity that can be used to determine the likely origin of new introductions that occur regularly for this invasive species. The genetic uniqueness of many populations and regions has important implications for attempts to control Ae. aegypti, especially for the methods using genetic modification of populations.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/[R01 AI101112]/NIAID/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/[3R01AI091646-04S1]/NIAID/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology; Volumen 25, Número 21. 2016es_ES
dc.subjectAedes aegypties_ES
dc.subjectAedes mascarensises_ES
dc.subjectHistoryes_ES
dc.subjectInvasiones_ES
dc.subjectMicrosatelliteses_ES
dc.titleGlobal genetic diversity of Aedes aegypties_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.13866es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Centro de Investigación en Enfermedades Tropicales (CIET)es_ES
dc.identifier.pmid27671732es_ES


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