Show simple item record

dc.creatorBrenes Sáenz, Juan Carlos
dc.creatorPadilla Mora, Michael
dc.creatorFornaguera Trías, Jaime
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-18T13:49:06Z
dc.date.available2017-12-18T13:49:06Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-30
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166432808004415?via%3Dihubes_ES
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/73694
dc.description.abstractOur previous work has shown that male Sprague–Dawley rats reared in social isolation, standard housing and environmental enrichment differ in their spontaneous open-field activity and in some neurobehavioral depressive-like parameters. Here, we extended this evidence by using a shorter postweaning rearing period (1 month) and including additional evaluations. First, in order to obtain a better characterization of the exploratory strategies among rearing conditions we analyzed in detail the spontaneous activity at the first minute and during the 10-min session. Second, we asked whether the changes in open-field activity were related with basal anxiety levels in the elevated plus-maze. Third, behavior in the forced-swimming test was analyzed and afterward, the tissue levels of hippocampal norepinephrine and serotonin were assessed. The possible relationship between neurotransmitters and forced-swimming behavior were explored through correlation analyses. We found that rearing conditions (i) differed on locomotor habituation and on sensory-motor exploration at the first minute and during the 10-min session without modifying the plus-maze behavior; (ii) affected differentially the grooming time, its sequential components, and the relationship between grooming and locomotor parameters; (iii) modified forced-swimming behavior and the hippocampal concentration of norepinephrine, serotonin, and its turnover; and (iv) produced different correlation patterns between both neurotransmitters and forced-swimming behaviors. Overall, environmental enrichment accelerated open-field habituation and led to behavioral and neurochemical antidepressant-like effects. In contract, isolation rearing strongly impaired habituation and simple information processing, but showed marginal effects on depressive-like behavior and on hippocampal neurochemistry. The current results suggest that differential rearing is not only a useful procedure to study behavioral plasticity or rigidity in response to early experience, but also to modeling some developmental protective or risk factors underlying depressive disorders.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[422-A6-609]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceBehavioural Brain Research, Vol. 197(1), pp. 125-137es_ES
dc.subjectEnvironmental enrichmentes_ES
dc.subjectSocial isolationes_ES
dc.subjectDepressiones_ES
dc.subjectAnxietyes_ES
dc.subjectOpen fieldes_ES
dc.subjectElevated plus-mazees_ES
dc.subjectForced swimminges_ES
dc.subjectHippocampuses_ES
dc.subjectSerotonines_ES
dc.subjectNorepinephrinees_ES
dc.titleA detailed analysis of open-field habituation and behavioral and neurochemical antidepressant-like effects in postweaning enriched ratses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2008.08.014
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Salud::Facultad de Medicina::Escuela de Medicinaes_ES
dc.identifier.pmid18786573


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record