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dc.creatorLomonte, Bruno
dc.creatorRey Suárez, Paola
dc.creatorFernández Ulate, Julián
dc.creatorSasa Marín, Mahmood
dc.creatorPla Ferrer, Davinia
dc.creatorVargas Vargas, Nancy
dc.creatorBénard Valle, Melisa
dc.creatorSanz, Libia
dc.creatorCorrêa Netto, Carlos
dc.creatorNúñez Rangel, Vitelbina
dc.creatorAlape Girón, Alberto
dc.creatorAlagón Cano, Alejandro
dc.creatorGutiérrez, José María
dc.creatorCalvete Chornet, Juan José
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T21:44:02Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T21:44:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifier.citationhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041010116302719#!es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0041-0101
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/74614
dc.description.abstractThe application of proteomic tools to the study of snake venoms has led to an impressive growth in the knowledge about their composition (venomics), immunogenicity (antivenomics), and toxicity (toxicovenomics). About one-third of all venomic studies have focused on elapid species, especially those of the Old World. The New World elapids, represented by coral snakes, have been less studied. In recent years, however, a number of venomic studies on Micrurus species from North, Central, and South America have been conducted. An overview of these studies is presented, highlighting the emergence of some patterns and trends concerning their compositional, functional, and immunological characteristics. Results gathered to date, encompassing 18 out of the approximately 85 species of Micrurus, reveal a dichotomy of venom phenotypes regarding the relative abundance of the omnipresent phospholipases A2 (PLA2) and 'three-finger' toxins (3FTx): a group of species express a PLA2-predominant venom composition, while others display a 3FTx-predominant compositional pattern. These two divergent toxin expression phenotypes appear to be related to phylogenetic positions and geographical distributions along a North-South axis in the Americas, but further studies encompassing a higher number of species are needed to assess these hypotheses. The two contrasting phenotypes also show correlations with some toxic functionalities, complexity in the diversity of proteoforms, and immunological crossrecognition patterns. The biological significance for the emergence of a dichotomy of venom compositions within Micrurus, in some cases observed even among sympatric species that inhabit relatively small geographic areas, represents a puzzling and challenging area of research which warrants further studies.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipMinisterio de Economía y Competitividad/[BFU2013-42833-P]//Españaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartamento Administrativo de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación/[111556933661]/COLCIENCIAS/Colombiaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[741-B3-760]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceToxicon, vol. 122. pp. 7-25es_ES
dc.subjectSnake venomes_ES
dc.subjectMicruruses_ES
dc.subjectCoral snakees_ES
dc.subjectVenomicses_ES
dc.subjectToxines_ES
dc.subjectProteomicses_ES
dc.subjectElapidaees_ES
dc.titleVenoms of Micrurus coral snakes: evolutionary trends in compositional patterns emerging from proteomic analyseses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.toxicon.2016.09.008
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP)es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto741-B3-760
dc.identifier.pmid27641749


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