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dc.creatorTroyo Rodríguez, Adriana
dc.creatorArheart, Kristopher L.
dc.creatorFuller, Douglas O.
dc.creatorCalderón Arguedas, Ólger
dc.creatorBeier, John C.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T21:26:50Z
dc.date.available2019-02-22T21:26:50Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.2008.79.200es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1476-1645
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/76604
dc.description.abstractGeospatial technologies have been increasingly applied to study vector-borne diseases, although their use in urban setting has been limited. In this study, high-resolution satellite imagery from QuickBird was analyzed to determine the relationships that urban structure, determined by tree cover and built area, may have with the abundance of mosquito larval habitats and the Aedes aegypti container index in an urban area of Costa Rica. Two cross-sectional entomological field surveys were performed in Greater Puntarenas during wet and dry seasons. A geographical sampling method was used to select the areas to be surveyed: a grid (100 by 100 meters) was constructed and a stratified random sample of 34 cells (10%) was selected. All possible larval habitats (wet habitats) were noted per cell, and mosquito larvae present were identified. Two seasonal land cover maps were prepared using QuickBird multispectral imagery with “water”, “built”, “tree”, “grass/bare soil”, and “paved” classes. The proportion of tree cover and built area was extracted for cells surveyed, and regression models were analyzed for the number of wet habitats, Ae. aegypti container index, and pupae per person. In the wet season and when corrected by the number of locations evaluated in each cell, tree cover (R2 = 0.650, p<0.001) and built area (R2 = 0.613, p<0.001) were able to significantly explain the variation in total larval habitats. Larval habitats were positively associated with tree cover and negatively associated with built area, while the proportion of Ae. aegypti positive containers was negatively associated with tree cover. The significant regression models were used to create maps of larval habitat abundance in Puntarenas at the cell level. Results showed that the abundance of mosquito habitats in urban environments may be explained and predicted by using remotely sensed information. Areas within the urban environment with greater tree cover probably contain numerous Ae. aegypti and other mosquito larval habitats in the wet season and should be targeted for more efficient vector control.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[803-A6-039]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.relation.ispartof
dc.sourceThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 79(6), pp. 200-249es_ES
dc.subjectAedes aegypties_ES
dc.subjectLarval habitatses_ES
dc.subjectPuntarenases_ES
dc.subjectCosta Ricaes_ES
dc.titleAssociations between urban structure and Aedes aegypti larval habitats in Puntarenas, Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjectes_ES
dc.date.updated2018-12-19T21:11:54Z
dc.identifier.doi10.4269/ajtmh.2008.79.200
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Centro de Investigación en Enfermedades Tropicales (CIET)es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto803-A6-039


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