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dc.creatorMata Jiménez, Leonardoes_ES
dc.creatorKronmal, Richard A.
dc.creatorUrrutia, Juan José
dc.creatorGarcía, Bertha
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T15:33:18Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T15:33:18Z
dc.date.issued1977
dc.identifier.citationhttps://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-abstract/30/8/1215/4650135?redirectedFrom=fulltextes_ES
dc.identifier.issn1938-3207
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/76792
dc.description.abstractData from a prospective study of a Guatemalan village population revealed an exceedingly high force of infection which may affect nutrition and growth from gestation onward. Maternal morbidity was higher and fetal antigenic stimulation was more frequent than in industrial societies. Infection of the young child was a common occurrence and, although a great many infections were silent, morbidity rates were extremely high, particularly during the protracted weaning period (6 to 24 months). Infectious disease was found to be an important cause of weight loss, arrest in height, and impaired physical growth. Also, it was a common precipitating factor of severe malnutrition and death. Analysis of the dietary data of fully weaned children did not reveal a deficit in protein intake. Most children, however, had very low calorie intakes. Infectious disease was a common cause of anorexia and of marked reduction in calorie intake, followed by weight loss and impaired physical growth. A strong inverse correlation was detected between infectious disease and calorie intake in the 2nd year of life, when children were being weaned. Infection is the most important isolated factor in the causation of malnutrition in the village. A reorientation of health and nutrition policies seems in line in view of failures of food supplementation programs, particularly with protein, in many parts of the world.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 30(8), pp.1215-1227es_ES
dc.subjectRisk Groups Nutritiones_ES
dc.subjectChild Nutritiones_ES
dc.subjectChild Nutrition Disorderses_ES
dc.subjectChild Nutrition Scienceses_ES
dc.subjectChild weigthes_ES
dc.subjectNutrition, Public Healthes_ES
dc.subjectInfectionses_ES
dc.titleEffect of infection on food intake and the nutritional state: perspectives as viewed from the viIlagees_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ajcn/30.8.1215
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud (INISA)es_ES


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