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dc.creatorMiloslavich de Klein, Patricia
dc.creatorDíaz Merlano, Juan Manuel
dc.creatorKlein Salas, Eduardo
dc.creatorAlvarado Barrientos, Juan José
dc.creatorDíaz, Cristina
dc.creatorGobin, Judith F.
dc.creatorEscobar Briones, Elva
dc.creatorCruz Motta, Juan José
dc.creatorWeil, Ernesto
dc.creatorCortés Núñez, Jorge
dc.creatorBastidas, Carolina
dc.creatorRobertson, Ross
dc.creatorZapata, Fernando A.
dc.creatorMartín Zazo, Alberto
dc.creatorCastillo, Julio
dc.creatorKazandjian, Aniuska
dc.creatorOrtíz, Manuel
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-14T20:00:37Z
dc.date.available2019-05-14T20:00:37Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationhttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0011916es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/77112
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different taxa.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipAlfred P. Sloan Foundation/[]//Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad Simón Bolívar/[]/USB/Venezuelaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSmithsonian Institution Marine Science Network/[]//Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourcePLoS ONE, vol.5(8), pp.1-25es_ES
dc.subjectCaribbean regiones_ES
dc.subjectmarine biodiversityes_ES
dc.titleMarine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patternses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.date.updated2019-04-12T22:15:51Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0011916
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (CIMAR)es_ES
dc.identifier.pmid20689856
dc.identifier.pmidPMC2914069


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