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dc.creatorFilgueira, Fernando
dc.creatorMartínez Franzoni, Juliana
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-21T20:25:38Z
dc.date.available2019-01-21T20:25:38Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-26
dc.identifier.citationhttps://academic.oup.com/sp/article-abstract/24/4/370/4775167?redirectedFrom=fulltext
dc.identifier.issn1468-2893
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/76447
dc.description.abstractSince 1990, men’s monopoly over economic resources, a key feature of gender inequality, has been irreversibly eroded across Latin America. Women’s access to income of their own has improved in dramatic ways. The most significant change preceded the Pink Tide years, fueled by structural conditions such as fertility drops and neoliberal policies’ downward pressure on male wages and employment. However, women’s access to resources remained conditioned by their socioeconomic status and the sexual division of labor at home. Against this backdrop, the Pink Tide expanded social income and made some progress regarding gender and class inequalities separately, yet not their perverse interactions.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceSocial Politics, vol.24(4), pp. 370-398.es_ES
dc.titleThe Divergence in Women’s Economic Empowerment: Class and Gender under the Pink Tidees_ES
dc.typeartículo científico
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/sp/jxx014
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Sociales::Facultad de Ciencias Sociales::Escuela de Ciencias Políticases_ES


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