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dc.creatorRojas Gätjens, Diego
dc.creatorFuentes Schweizer, Paola
dc.creatorRojas Jiménez, Keilor Osvaldo
dc.creatorPérez Pantoja, Danilo
dc.creatorAvendaño Vega, Roberto
dc.creatorAlpízar Mena, Randall
dc.creatorCoronado Ruiz, Carolina
dc.creatorChavarría Vargas, Max
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-28T15:38:32Z
dc.date.available2022-07-28T15:38:32Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-17
dc.identifier.citationhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00248-021-01748-1es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1432-184X
dc.identifier.issn0095-3628
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/87062
dc.description.abstractIn this work, we studied the microbial community and the physicochemical conditions prevailing in an exploratory oil well, abandoned a century ago, located in the Cahuita National Park (Costa Rica). According to our analysis, Cahuita well is characterized by a continuous efflux of methane and the presence of a mixture of hydrocarbons including phenanthrene/anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, dibenzothiophene, tricyclic terpanes, pyrene, sesquiterpenes, sterane, and n-alkanes. Based on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we detected a significant abundance of methylotrophic bacteria such as Methylobacillus (6.3–26.0% of total reads) and Methylococcus (4.1–30.6%) and the presence of common genera associated with hydrocarbon degradation, such as Comamonas (0.8–4.6%), Hydrogenophaga (1.5–3.3%) Rhodobacter (1.0–4.9%), and Flavobacterium (1.1–6.5%). The importance of C1 metabolism in this niche was confirmed by amplifying the methane monooxygenase (MMO)–encoding gene (pmo) from environmental DNA and the isolation of two strains closely related to Methylorubrum rhodesianum and Paracoccus communis with the ability to growth using methanol and formate as sole carbon source respectively. In addition, we were able to isolated 20 bacterial strains from the genera Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Microbacterium which showed the capability to grow using the hydrocarbons detected in the oil well as sole carbon source. This work describes the physicochemical properties and microbiota of an environment exposed to hydrocarbons for 100 years, and it not only represents a contribution to the understanding of microbial communities in environments with permanently high concentrations of these compounds but also has biotechnological implications for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted sites.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[809-B8-518]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCentro Nacional de Innovaciones Biotecnológicas/[ACT172128]/CENIBiot/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipAgencia Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo/[FB0002]/ANID/Chilees_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipFondo Nacional de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico/[1201741]/FONDECYT/Chilees_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceMicrobial Ecology; Vol. 83: 2022 pp. 83-99es_ES
dc.subjectMethylotrophic bacteriaes_ES
dc.subjectMethylobacilluses_ES
dc.subjectMethylococcuses_ES
dc.subjectMethylorubrumes_ES
dc.subjectParacoccuses_ES
dc.subjectPseudomonases_ES
dc.subjectHYDROCARBONSes_ES
dc.subjectOil welles_ES
dc.subjectCahuita National Parkes_ES
dc.titleMethylotrophs and Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Are Key Players in the Microbial Community of an Abandoned Century-Old Oil Exploration Welles_ES
dc.typeartículo originales_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-021-01748-1
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Electroquímica y Energía Química (CELEQ)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Básicas::Facultad de Ciencias::Escuela de Químicaes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Básicas::Facultad de Ciencias::Escuela de Biologíaes_ES


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