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dc.creatorFerrari, Gerson Luis de Moraes
dc.creatorWerneck, André de Oliveira
dc.creatorda Silva, Danilo Rodrigues
dc.creatorKovalskys, Irina
dc.creatorGómez Salas, Georgina
dc.creatorRigotti, Attilio
dc.creatorCortés Sanabria, Lilia Yadira
dc.creatorYépez García, Martha Cecilia
dc.creatorPareja Torres, Rossina Gabriella
dc.creatorHerrera Cuenca, Marianella
dc.creatorZalcman Zimberg, Ioná
dc.creatorGuajardo, Viviana
dc.creatorPratt, Michael
dc.creatorCofre Bolados, Cristian Javier
dc.creatorFuentes Kloss, Rodrigo
dc.creatorRollo, Scott
dc.creatorFisberg, Mauro
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-08T16:27:36Z
dc.date.available2022-09-08T16:27:36Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-03
dc.identifier.citationhttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/15/5587es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/87336
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to identify socio-demographic correlates of total and domain-specific sedentary behavior (SB). Methods: Cross-sectional findings are based on 9218 participants (15–65 years) from the Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health. Data were collected between September 2014 and February 2015. Participants reported time spent in SB across specific domains. Sex, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic (SEL), and education level were used as sociodemographic indicators. Results: Participants spent a total of 373.3 min/day engaged in total SB. Men, younger adults, other ethnicities, higher SEL and educational level presented higher total SB when compared with women, older adults, white/Caucasian, and low SEL and educational level. Men spent more time on the playing videogames (b: 32.8: 95% CI: 14.6;51.1) and riding in an automobile (40.5: 31.3; 49.8). Computer time, reading, socializing or listening to music was higher in younger participants (<30 years) compared with those ≥50 years in the total sample. Compared to the low SEL and educational level groups, middle (11.7: 5.7; 17.6) and higher (15.1: 5.3; 24.9) SEL groups as well as middle (9.8: 3.6; 15.9) and higher (16.6: 6.5; 26.8) education level groups reported more time spent reading. Conclusion: Socio-demographic characteristics are associated with SB patterns (total and specific) across Latin American countries.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipCoca Cola Company///Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipFerrero///Italiaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Life Science Institute//ILSI/Argentinaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica//UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipPontificia Universidad Católica de Chile///Chilees_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipPontificia Universidad Javeriana///Colombiaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad Central de Venezuela//UCV/Venezuelaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad San Francisco de Quito///Ecuadores_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Investigación Nutricional de Perú///Perúes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipSão Paulo Research Foundation/[2019/24124-7]/FAPESP/Braziles_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipHospital Infantil Sabará///Brasiles_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health; Vol. 17 Núm. 15: 2020es_ES
dc.subjectSedentary behavioures_ES
dc.subjectScreen-timees_ES
dc.subjectSittinges_ES
dc.subjectEPIDEMIOLOGYes_ES
dc.subjectSociodemographices_ES
dc.subjectLATIN AMERICAes_ES
dc.titleSocio-Demographic Correlates of Total and Domain-Dpecific Sedentary Behavior in Latin American: A Population-Based Studyes_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph1755587
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Salud::Facultad de Medicina::Escuela de Medicinaes_ES


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