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dc.creatorMata Jiménez, Leonardoes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-05T22:41:49Z
dc.date.available2014-06-05T22:41:49Z
dc.date.issued1976
dc.identifier.citationhttp://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4684-2883-4_5es
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4684-2885-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/11081
dc.descriptioncapítulo de libro -- Universidad de Costa Rica, 1976es
dc.description.abstractThe study of the relation of man to his environment in developing countries emphasizes the inevitable need for societies to recognize the true causes of infection, malnutrition, and poverty. The need is for improvement in the quality of human life in less developed nations, a recommendation easy to prescribe but difficult to accomplish. Although our pool of knowledge is incomplete, it is adequate to suggest ways to diminish infection, increase food production, utilize food more efficiently, improve education, and provide systems of justice to protect the classes most in need. The physical environment in tropical and subtropical regions, and the socioeconomic characteristics of the population inhabiting such regions, favor maintenance and transmission of a variety of viruses, bacteria, and parasites that make agricultural progress and social development difficult, and that contribute to poor fetal growth, nutrient wastage, and deficient postnatal physical growth. accounting for most of the childhood morbidity and mortality. In this regard. infections contribute indirectly to the overall food problem in a similar fashion as pests do in terms of food losses and spoilage. The overall effect could be comparable or greater than that resulting from an inadequate capacity to produce or to purchase the food needed. Thus, my objective has been to stress, within the whole environment, the importance of infection and the need to diminish it. Waysto control and prevent infection are readily known. They have to do with education of the population to improve personal and environmental hygiene. Economic investment is necessary to improve housing and water supply sYstems, waste disposal, and such preventive measures as immunization programs. Although such measures may appear expensive when first implemented, they have long-lasting effects and many require minimal expenditure once they are established. Large segments of the population stand to benefit, and other development interventions can then be introduced. However, these measures should not be implemented singly. They should be accompanied by community development, family planning, social legislation-in other words, the holistic approach to health and welfare. To do otherwise may aggravate the problem by stimulating demographic growth, perpetuating malnutrition and infection, and maintaining underdevelopmentes
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Ricaes
dc.language.isoen_USes
dc.relationNutrition and Agricultural Development. Significance and Potential for the Tropics. N.S. Scrimshaw & M. Bghar (editors). Plenum Press, Volume 7, 1976, pp 45-66es
dc.subjectDesnutriciones
dc.subjectNutritiones
dc.subjectAgricultural Developmentes
dc.subjectDesarrollo económico y sociales
dc.titleThe Environment of the Malnourished Childes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bookPartes_ES
dc.typeCapítulo de libroes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4684-2883-4_5
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud (INISA)es


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