Show simple item record

dc.creatorMcKenzie, Sean K.
dc.creatorWinston, Max E.
dc.creatorGrewe, Felix
dc.creatorVargas Asensio, Juan Gabriel
dc.creatorRodríguez Hernández, Natalia
dc.creatorRubin, Benjamin E. R.
dc.creatorMurillo Cruz, Catalina
dc.creatorvon Beren, Christoph
dc.creatorMoreau, Corrie S.
dc.creatorSuen, Garret
dc.creatorPinto Tomás, Adrián A.
dc.creatorKronauer, Daniel J. C.
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-30T16:27:44Z
dc.date.available2022-06-30T16:27:44Z
dc.date.issued2021-09
dc.identifier.citationhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mec.16198es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1365-294X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/86846
dc.description.abstractThe evolution of mass raiding has allowed army ants to become dominant arthropod predators in the tropics. Although a century of research has led to many discoveries about behavioural, morphological and physiological adaptations in army ants, almost nothing is known about the molecular basis of army ant biology. Here we report the genome of the iconic New World army ant Eciton burchellii, and show that it is unusu-ally compact, with a reduced gene complement relative to other ants. In contrast to this overall reduction, a particular gene subfamily (9-exon ORs) expressed predomi-nantly in female antennae is expanded. This subfamily has previously been linked to the recognition of hydrocarbons, key olfactory cues used in insect communication and prey discrimination. Confocal microscopy of the brain showed a correspond-ing expansion in a putative hydrocarbon response centre within the antennal lobe, while scanning electron microscopy of the antenna revealed a particularly high den-sity of hydrocarbon-sensitive sensory hairs. E. burchellii shares these features with its predatory and more cryptic relative, the clonal raider ant. By integrating genomic, transcriptomic and anatomical analyses in a comparative context, our work thus pro-vides evidence that army ants and their relatives possess a suite of modifications in the chemosensory system that may be involved in behavioural coordination and prey selection during social predation. It also lays the groundwork for future studies of army ant biology at the molecular level.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation/[NSF IOS 1916995]/NSF/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation/[NSF DEB 1900357]/NSF/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison/[BE 5177/4-1]//Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[810-B3-273]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health/[GM066699]/NIH/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipMarie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship/[ID 797969]/MSCA IF/Bélgicaes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology, vol.30(24), pp.6627-6641.es_ES
dc.subjectEciton burchelliies_ES
dc.subjectGenomaes_ES
dc.subjectEvoluciónes_ES
dc.subjectAdaptación quimio-sensoriales_ES
dc.subjectChemosensationes_ES
dc.subjectEcological adaptationes_ES
dc.subjectEvolutiones_ES
dc.subjectEvolutionary genomicses_ES
dc.subjectGene familyes_ES
dc.subjectGenome evolutiones_ES
dc.subjectGenomics/proteomicses_ES
dc.titleThe genomic basis of army ant chemosensory adaptationses_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.16198
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Estructuras Microscópicas (CIEMIC)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Biología Celular y Molecular (CIBCM)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Salud::Facultad de Medicina::Escuela de Medicinaes_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto810-B3-273


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record